Click here to access the summer reading program website.

Teen Poetry Contest

Teen Poetry Contest
Visalia Branch Library
For poets age 14 through 17



 CONTEST RULES:
¨ Poem must be an original work (any topic).  
¨ Maximum length of poem: one page.
¨ One entry per poet.
¨ Poem may be hand written (legibly!) or typed.
¨ Write your name, your age, and phone number on your poem submittal. 
¨ Let us know if the library can display the poem with your name and age. 
¨ Two prizes awarded: 
¨ Prize #1 for a poem written in a traditional form (such as sonnet, villanelle, haiku, etc.)
¨ Prize #2 will be awarded to a non-traditional poem.
¨ All remaining poems will be placed in a random drawing for a third prize. 

Submit your poems in April at the Children’s reference desk.
Last day for entry is Friday, April 28, 2017 at 5:45pm.
Prize winners contacted on Friday, May 5. 2017.

Teen Tabletop Gaming & new Dungeons & Dragons Group


Are you a teen between 13 and 19? Interested in learning how to play Dungeons and Dragons (or, if you speak geek, D & D) or other tabletop games like Settler of Catan or Betrayal at House on the Hill? Or are you a tabletop gamer looking for some friends to game with?

We invite teen players of all levels to join our group of teen tabletop games.  We’re gaming in the Blue Room on Thursday, May 18th at 4:00pm. Join our fledgling group of D & D players, as we craft our characters and begin gameplay.  (D & D is an RPG game originally published in 1974, and has been recently repopularized by the eerie Netflix series Stranger Things.


Or start a quick game of Apples to Apples, Exploding Kittens, or One Night Werewolf.  Or learn a new game. Or watch and learn. Snacks will be served—we never game on an empty stomach! This is event is free and generously sponsored by the Friends of the Tulare County Library. Registration is not required—just show up!


TEEN SUMMER INTERNS WANTED

SUMMER INTERNS WANTED
Get valuable job experience at the library!

  
The Tulare County Friends of the Library are offering a Scholarship to three teen summer interns who will assist with our
 Summer Reading Program!

Teens ages 14-19 are welcome to apply.

Interns must be available Tuesday, June 13th though Saturday, July 22
Interns receive a Friends of the Library scholarship of $300
Applications are available at the Children’s and Adult Reference desks and on the Teen Bulletin Board.

Return your application to the Children’s Reference desk 
by  May 6th, 2017.
The top candidates will be interviewed beginning May 19th.


Without our teen volunteers, we could not offer such a successful Summer Reading Program each year. 

Our Teen Summer Reading Interns will take on the responsibility of training, coaching, and scheduling our wonderful volunteers during our busiest time of the year. 

Please email any questions about the internship to Carrie Wilson, the Youth Services Librarian at 
carrie.wilson@tularecountylibrary.org. 


"Libraries Were My Safe Haven" Guest Blog Post for National Library Week by Fiona Battistoni

I’ve always been a bit of an outcast. I don’t say that for your pity--it’s just the truth. I can be somewhat socially awkward, and I have a tendency to play by the beat of my own drum. Because of that, although I had plenty of friends, I never really had a cemented “group” in school. It was frustrating and lonely when I was younger, but these days, I don’t mind it so much. I have my family, I have my friends, and I have my art. I’m at peace with who I am, and libraries are a big part of how I've achieved that.

Libraries were my safe haven when I was younger. When I was feeling lonely or misunderstood, I could lose myself in the pages of a book and find characters who weren’t all that different from myself. From Hermione Granger to Annabeth Chase, Violet Baudelaire to Susan Pevensie, books gave me a window to better understand both myself and the world around me--and libraries gave me access to hundreds of them, all for free (in theory… I admittedly tend to rack up late fees rather quickly!).

More recently, libraries have also become a way for me to be more involved in my community and break out of my shell a little. I’ve made some of my closest friends through volunteering at the library, and I’ve been able to meet so many more wonderful people (and read so many more wonderful books!).

To me, the library has never just been the place you go to find free books (although that is a lovely perk). Libraries are places where you can find a sense of belonging and self-knowledge that is incredibly difficult to find anywhere else.


 -- Fiona Battistoni, teen blogger

National Library Week contest

National Library Week is coming up next week! We're celebrating libraries and what they offer to all people, regardless of age, class, gender, national origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation.  I invite teens to write a blog post (around 100-150 words) about what libraries mean to you. You can use English, Spanish, emoji, code  or any combination of your choosing. Posts, whether anonymous or credited, will be placed on the Library Teen Webpage and entered in a drawing to win a $10 Starbucks gift card! To be eligible for the drawing, please submit posts by April 15th to Youth Librarian Carrie Wilson, Carrie.Wilson@Tularecountylibrary.org



Cold-Case Christianity: Reviewed by Fariba Rodriguez

Cold-Case Christianity Book Review
A couple months ago I went to an event at a church where they talked about teens believing in God. In this event, there was a man named Jim Warner Wallace. He described himself as a former cold case detective, which means he solved cases that had been dead for many years. He also said he was a former atheist because that’s how he grew up. Until he decided to put his problem-solving talent into investigating the Bible, and that is how he became a Christian. He wrote two books one called Cold Case Christianity and the other God’s Crime Scene, and I purchased them both and got them signed. I also got to talk to him for like 10 minutes about the field he’s in, because I’m very interested. The experience was amazing and I’m glad I got to take some of that home with me, and here is some of what I encountered while reading this book.
In Cold-Case Christianity, J. Warner Wallace took some of his real life detective experiences and applied them to this book. He investigated the finest details of the New Testament and checked if they made sense to the science and fact-based point of view. Some of the things he looked at were to see if the apostles could’ve written the gospels and how and when they wrote them. There’s also many scientific facts he looked at to see if they were possible. One of them that stuck with me was the fact that blood and water came out of Jesus’ side. Wallace says this is a pericardial effusion, which could be caused by the shock of the flogging or by being pierced by a spear. He also said that this was a great observation from the apostles considering they weren’t doctors or knew anything about that. This is just one of the many great things he has brought to attention to take a deeper look at. This book was also featured in the movie God's Not Dead 2, as well as Wallace, so he obviously knows what he's talking about.
Overall this is a great book if you’re looking to strengthen your faith in God. If you’re interested in detective type work, this may also interest you as there is a lot of helpful information on the work of detectives. Even if you’re just looking for a good read check this book out, there’s a little bit for everyone and it doesn’t hurt to learn something new.


- Fariba Rodriguez, teen reviewer Image result for cold case christianity

Did you enjoy this review? Would you like to submit your own review? Then please contact the Youth Services Librarian, Carrie Wilson @ carrie.wilson@TulareCountyLibrary.org for more information. 

Be a Volunteer Blogger

Hey, looking for a way to earn community service hours? Do you like to write? Consider being a guest blogger on the Tulare County Teens website.

FAQs: 

What do I  write? 
It's up to you. We will post reviews--these can be YA book reviews, but you can review anything you're interested in, like movies, TV shows, music, Youtube channels, app and tech reviews.

How long should the posts be? 
About 100 words minimum. Feel free to add pictures, gifs, etc. Longer is fine, but novel length? Yeah, no.



How do I get volunteer credit?  

Volunteer credit for blog entries will be offered to teens ages 14-19. You will email your entries to Carrie Wilson, the Youth Services librarian at carrie.wilson@tularecountylibrary.org. I will log your hours based on how many entries you submit. 1 entry of at least 100 words =  1 hour of community service credit.

What if I am not a volunteer? 

If you are not already a volunteer, then you will need to sign up! Pick up an application at the library, or visit http://tularecountylibrary.org/pdfs/VolunteerApp.pdf to print out an application. Return the application to the circulation desk and we will contact you asap! You will attend an orientation and you'll find out about the many other ways you can be involved in the library.